Strategy Southern Africa Regional Programme

Regional Cooperation Strategy for Southern Africa 2018 – 2022

The overall goal of the Swiss Regional Strategy for Southern Africa 2018–22 (PDF, 1.7 MB, English) is to contribute to the reduction of poverty and vulnerability in the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region by increasing resilience for enhanced food security and reducing new HIV infections.

The strategy is aligned with the Dispatch on Switzerland’s International Cooperation 2017–2020 and Vision 2030, contributing to four of its seven strategic objectives: access to resources and services; promotion of sustainable economic growth; preventing and managing the consequences of crisis and disasters, and of fragility and gender equality strengthening.

The strategy follows a two-pronged ‘regional approach’ that, firstly, strengthens SADC’s normative role in policy setting at regional level, thereby incentivising countries’ adoption and implementation of policies. Secondly, it also assures that successful local initiatives in SADC member countries impact national policies, standards and guidelines etc. and inspire and influence SADC regional policy setting and reach scale (potentially millions of beneficiaries in several countries as in the case of the abolition of child marriage).

Geographic concentration with a regional outreach

While policy influencing work will continue at regional and national levels, implementation of programmes at national level will henceforth focus on the seven countries of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) SENAP Division19: five countries (Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Lesotho, Swaziland) under the classification for Southern African Region in the Dispatch on Switzerland’s International Cooperation 2017–2020, and two countries (Mozambique and Tanzania) with country offices from the bilateral aid. In view of geographic concentration Lesotho and Swaziland will receive lower financial support over the coming years as compared to the past. Needs in food security and HIV/AIDS nevertheless remain tremendous in these two small countries, where very few development aid organisations are present. The intention is thus that these two and other SADC countries continue to benefit from RPSA through policy influencing and adoption and domestication of policies promoted.

Domains of intervention

The overall goal is to contribute to the reduction of poverty and vulnerability in the SADC region by increasing resilience for food security and reducing new HIV infections. With its portfolio, the SDC will help to reduce food insecurity by promoting sustainable agriculture, youth employment and DRR; and to fight HIV/AIDS by improving prevention and viral suppression.