Federal Department of Foreign Affairs FDFA

Switzerland's unequivocal support for the International Criminal Court

At the annual meeting of the 123 states that have ratified the Rome Statute – the basis of the International Criminal Court under international law – FDFA State Secretary Krystyna Marty Lang reiterated Switzerland's unequivocal support for the Court. Switzerland is thus contributing to the enforcement of international humanitarian law and human rights and is fighting impunity for the most serious crimes of all.

FDFA State Secretary Krystyna Marty Lang stands in a wood-panelled room and speaks into a camera. The Swiss flag can be seen in the background.

n a video statement, FDFA State Secretary Krystyna Marty Lang reiterates Switzerland's unequivocal support for the International Criminal Court in The Hague. © FDFA

The International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague is a crucial component of the international legal order. In line with its own fundamental values, Switzerland supports the Court in the fight against impunity. "The Court is the result of decades of tireless efforts to prosecute perpetrators of the most serious international crimes: Genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and crimes of aggression" stresses Krystyna Marty Lang, FDFA State Secretary ad interim, at the annual gathering of all 123 states that have ratified the Rome Statute - the international legal basis of the Criminal Court. On this occasion, which will take place from 14 to 23 December in The Hague and New York, the State Secretary underlined Switzerland's continued support for the institution: "Today I reiterate Switzerland's unequivocal support for the International Criminal Court."

Today I reiterate Switzerland's unequivocal support for the International Criminal Court.
Krystyna Marty Lang, State Secretary a.i.

At this year's Assembly, Switzerland is particularly committed to the adoption of an efficient and inclusive follow-up process to the independent review of the ICC in order to strengthen its capacity. It is also committed to the election of qualified persons to key positions at the ICC, including six new judges and the new Chief Prosecutor.

Fighting impunity: a foreign policy priority

Respecting, strengthening and promoting international humanitarian law and human rights are priorities of the FDFA's foreign policy strategy. Switzerland has a long humanitarian tradition. With its support for an effective International Criminal Court, Switzerland is actively engaged in the fight against impunity in cases of the most serious international crimes and is committed to improving the protection of victims.

The International Criminal Court

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is a permanent institution based in The Hague. It is responsible for judging the most serious crimes that affect the international community as a whole: War crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and aggression. The basis of the institution under international law is the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court of 17 July 1998. Switzerland ratified the Rome Statute on 12 October 2001. The Rome Statute now has 123 contracting states.

The ICC only prosecutes individuals and only intervenes when the competent national authorities are unable or unwilling to prosecute these crimes.

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