Bilateral relations Switzerland – Taiwan (Chinese Taipei)

In line with its One China policy, Switzerland does not recognize Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) as an independent state. Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) is nevertheless an important trading partner for Switzerland.

Key Aspects of Bilateral Relations

Two private organisations support relations between Switzerland and Taiwan (Chinese Taipei): for Switzerland, the Trade Office of Swiss Industries (TOSI) and, for Taiwan (Chinese Taipei), the Cultural and Economic Delegation in Bern and Geneva. Although they do not have diplomatic status, these two representations provide consular services.

Economic Relations

Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) is Switzerland's fifth biggest export market in Asia. Federal Customs Administration statistics show that Swiss exports to Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) consist mainly of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, watches, as well as machinery and electronic equipment. Imports into Switzerland are largely made up of machinery, electronic equipment and bicycles. 

Information on Countries, SECO

Swiss Nationals in Taiwan (Chinese Taipei)

At the end of 2018, there were 330 Swiss nationals living in Taiwan (Chinese Taipei).

History of Bilateral Relations

Since Switzerland recognised the People's Republic of China on 17 January 1950, it has aligned itself with its One-China policy and considers the Republic of China – the name adopted by the authorities of Taiwan (Chinese Taipei) – to be a non-independent territory which is part of China. At the bilateral and international level, Switzerland only maintains relations with the People’s Republic of China, with its seat of government in Beijing.

Taiwan (Chinese Taipei), Historical Dictionary of Switzerland (de, fr, it)